Welcome to Wild – A Comprehensive Guide on Transitioning from Standard to Wild

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About NightDrawn:

“NightDrawn is a dedicated Standard and Wild player, playing since 2015. In his time playing the game so far, he has topped multiple local tournaments, played almost every deck you could name, and crafted far too many golden Legendaries to count.

Night also often updates safe dusting charts for the game:

So, you’ve been dragging on in Standard against 2-3 decks that have been at the top and persisted through multiple metas and/or expansions. Or, you’ve grown bored of the limited card pool of the Standard mode and want to spice up your decks. Maybe you just want to try a different mode and experience what it’s like. All are valid reasons to why you want to start playing Wild, but first let’s get some common worries, questions, and misconceptions about the mode cleared up.

Is Wild more expensive than Standard?

The most simple and basic answer is no. If that’s all you need to hear, then move on. If you aren’t convinced, let’s take a moment to talk about why. Firstly, Wild has an odd and complex way relating to how it’s pricing scales/adjusts throughout metas/expansions, and for the most part the mode tends to balance out or even offer a cheaper alternative to the Standard mode whether the player is on a new account or not. This is because there tends to be Epic and Legendary cards that support new or even old archetypes in Standard that are simply outclassed by comparable cards in Wild. In addition to this, Wild cards that are comparable or outclass new Standard cards will forever be relevant in the mode, as they will not rotate or be moved to another mode (which is what happens with Standard). Despite this fact, some players still feel that spending money and dust on old cards is a risk. However this mentality is actually proven more so in Standard. Certain strategies a class may have in one expansion cycle in a Standard year can easily be drowned out or completely changed expansion to expansion and are more prone to occur, whereas a strategy in Wild is generally strengthened or made viable through new expansion releases (an example of this would be the Highlander/Reno archetype in Wild getting strengthened by the release of Saviors of Uldum, which forever strengthens that archetype in Wild but will completely rotate out of the game for Standard-only players eventually)


Does Wild fall into the same meta trap that Standard tends to?

Yes and no. There will always be a set of best decks in any sort of mode (or card game in general for that matter). However, Wild historically seems to offer a much wider variety of viable deck types that can compete with one another and not completely counter certain decks (specific cards that counter decks would not make the deck itself a counter to another deck). As a result, Wild generally feels more fresh than Standard at any given point.


What are the strengths of Wild compared to Standard?

  • Your collection diminishes at a much, much slower rate than a Standard-only player’s would
  • Archetypes/playstyles you love in Standard have the chance to persist, grow, and evolve in Wild over time
  • There are many archetypes/playstyles available that are not and will never be available in Standard
  • Ranking, including both to Legend and in Legend is arguably more easy in Wild
  • Less money if even any needs to be spent on each new expansion since only a subset of new cards will make it into Wild decks

What are the weaknesses of Wild compared to Standard?

  • Certain problem cards persist in Wild throughout each meta/expansion and can at times drown out new strategies (these problem cards include but are not limited to: Barnes/Resurrect Package, Genn/Baku, Reno/Highlander Package, Jade Idol)
  • Wild historically has gotten much less attention than Standard has when it comes to things such as nerfs
  • Many strategies in Wild that either persist in the mode or are introduced to it prevent ones seen in Standard from emerging in the mode
  • An unlucky/unfortunate session of play often feels much worse than one in Standard would

[If there are any questions or concerns about the Wild mode that you did not see listed/answered here, please submit a feedback survey response (linked at the end of this guide) or alternatively contact me through Twitter so that I can address them and add them if needed.]

Safe Dusting Chart (Standard)         |      Safe Dusting Chart (Wild)


Wild Resources:


Hearthstone Years & Their Respective Sets:

  • Launch Year (Classic, Curse of Naxxramas, Goblins & Gnomes, Blackrock Mountain, Grand Tournament, League of Explorers)
  • Year of the Kraken (Whispers of the Old Gods, One Night in Karazhan, Mean Streets of Gadgetzan)
  • Year of the Mammoth (Journey to Un’Goro, Knights of the Frozen Throne, Kobolds & Catacombs)
  • Year of the Raven (Witchwood, Boomsday Project, Rastakhan’s Rumble)
  • Year of the Dragon (Rise of Shadows, Saviors of Uldum, TBA)

Where to Start and How to Start

Where you start transitioning to Wild depends on your investment in the game at this point (monetary and/or amount of grind) and what you want to play. To figure out how to start your transition, follow one of the paths below.

-> I’ve invested a great deal into this game and have an extensive collection. (Sets owned: All Years)

If you fit into this category, then transitioning to Wild should prove to be a much easier route than you may think. If you plan to still play Standard in addition to Wild, then curate and clean up your collection based off both of the dusting charts linked above. If not, then only follow the Wild dusting chart.

Since you own all sets (or at least a majority of all sets), you should be in a spot where you can start playing Wild in the super short term or even immediately. At this point you can refer to online resources for putting together a deck. Personally I would recommend using HSReplay or the most current Tempo Storm Meta Snapshot as a starting point, however some prefer the deep dive Vicious Syndicate’s Data Reaper Reports provide. If you are not familiar with many Wild decks, refer to the next section of this guide where I do a deep dive on the different deck types that have persisted in Wild. This section of the guide will also cover the best route for completing a particular Wild deck.

-> I’ve invested a great deal into this game but only have an extensive Standard collection. (Sets owned: Launch Year, Year of the Raven, Year of the Dragon)

If you fit into this category, then transitioning to Wild should prove to be a much easier route than you may think. If you plan to still play Standard in addition to Wild, then curate and clean up your collection based off both of the dusting charts linked above. If not, then only follow the Wild dusting chart.

Since you own all Standard sets (or at least a majority of all Standard sets), you should be in a spot where you can build up a Wild collection in the short term or even immediately (depending on your available dust/money). Since you missed Year of the Mammoth’s sets (Journey to Un’Goro, Knights of the Frozen Throne, and Kobolds and Catacombs), your Wild collection is in need of some help. This is because many strong and prominent cards in the Wild format come from these particular expansions. In addition to these, if you missed Witchwood in particular, you will also be missing two key cards present in top tier Wild decks (Baku the Mooneater in Odd Rogue/Paladin and Genn Greymane in Even Shaman/Warlock).

At this point you can refer to online resources for putting together a deck. Personally I would recommend using HSReplay or the most current Tempo Storm Meta Snapshot as a starting point, however some prefer the deep dive Vicious Syndicate’s Data Reaper Reports provide. If you are not familiar with many Wild decks, refer to the next section of this guide where I do a deep dive on the different deck types that have persisted in Wild. This section of the guide will also cover the best route for completing a particular Wild deck.

-> I’m not too invested into this game and do not have that extensive of a Standard collection. (Sets owned: Launch Year, Year of the Kraken, Year of the Mammoth, Year of the Raven)

If you fit into this category, then transitioning to Wild may or may not be an easy transition. This is because Wild is still supported by new cards too! Since you’ve only missed one year of Standard sets, growing a sustainable Wild collection should not prove too much of a struggle. If you plan to still play Standard in addition to Wild, then curate and clean up your collection based off both of the dusting charts linked above. If not, then only follow the Wild dusting chart.

Realistically you should not have to spend money on Year of the Dragon’s sets unless there is a specific deck type you are trying to build that relies on multiple cards released in this year. As a result, you can start referring to online resources for putting together a deck. Personally I would recommend using HSReplay or the most current Tempo Storm Meta Snapshot as a starting point, however some prefer the deep dive Vicious Syndicate’s Data Reaper Reports provide. If you are not familiar with many Wild decks, refer to the next section of this guide where I do a deep dive on the different deck types that have persisted in Wild. This section of the guide will also cover the best route for completing a particular Wild deck.

-> I’ve invested a great deal into this game in the past but have not recently and as a result do not have a Standard collection. (Sets owned: Launch Year, Year of the Kraken, Year of the Mammoth)

If you fit into this category, then it means transitioning to Wild will be a tougher transition. Since you’ve missed a full 2 years of Standard sets, it may be time to spend some to catch back up (or alternatively start the struggle of grinding out that amount of loss). Generally speaking, missing just one year of Standard sets can mostly be quickly mended, especially if a deck you’re playing has remained relevant and not had many changes throughout a specific year. However by missing 2 full years of Standard sets, there are bound to be multiple cards throughout multiple decks that are needed to complete them. With this route, you should take caution with spending dust or money on a deck that could lose relevance expansion to expansion. If you plan to still play Standard in addition to Wild, then curate and clean up your collection based off both of the dusting charts linked above. If not, then only follow the Wild dusting chart.

At this point you can refer to online resources for putting together a deck. Personally I would recommend using HSReplay or the most current Tempo Storm Meta Snapshot as a starting point, however some prefer the deep dive Vicious Syndicate’s Data Reaper Reports provide. If you are not familiar with many Wild decks, refer to the next section of this guide where I do a deep dive on the different deck types that have persisted in Wild. This section of the guide will also cover the best route for completing a particular Wild deck.

-> I am a new player that wants to start growing a Wild collection specifically. (Sets owned: A portion of Launch Year or Launch Year, Year of the Kraken)

Similar to how collection building occurs in Standard for new players/accounts, you will have to decide on a single deck (or group or deck types, such as Reno or Odd/Even) and dump all your available resources into that/those list(s) alone. At this point you can refer to online resources for putting together a deck. Personally I would recommend using HSReplay or the most current Tempo Storm Meta Snapshot as a starting point, however some prefer the deep dive Vicious Syndicate’s Data Reaper Reports provide. If you are not familiar with many Wild decks, refer to the next section of this guide where I do a deep dive on the different deck types that have persisted in Wild. This section of the guide will also cover the best route for completing a particular Wild deck.


Decks, What They Do, And How To Build Them

Tips Before Starting Deckbuilding:

  • Curate/Clean up your collection using the dusting charts linked above, according to the recommended route above
  • Buy up to 10 packs of every expansion you missed, either with gold or money. This is because Hearthstone has a system in place that guarantees a Legendary within the first 10 packs of an expansion. If buying with gold, just buy one pack at a time until you pull your guaranteed Legendary. If you are (or can only) buy with money, it is recommended that you just buy the 15 pack bundle option so you don’t lose more money by getting unlucky with a 2 and 7 pack bundle (you spend $7 more, but do not run the risk of having the guaranteed Legendary being in the 10th pack, which tends to happen)
  • Talk to others in the Wild community so you can get an idea of what decks are performing well and/or are relevant at the current time. Even though this guide will be updated often, there may be unexpected shifts in a given meta that alter/change decklists or even render them irrelevant for a particular reason.

Persistent Lists:

Lists in this category have proven and continue to prove to be lists that can stay relevant and exist throughout multiple metas and expansions of the game. Realistically, any of the following decks below should be a solid long term investment of resources.

Reno/Highlander

Renolock (Reno Warlock)

    • Overview: Renolock is a Highlander archetype deck, meaning that the list cannot contain any duplicate cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, powerful effects are activated in the key Highlander cards such as Reno Jackson, Kazakus, and Zephyrs the Great. Renolock in specific takes advantage of Warlock’s defensive Demon package (Bloodreaver Gul’dan, Voidlord, Mal’Ganis, Riftcleaver, Despicable Dreadlord, and Voidcaller) to protect and even make non-threatening Demons a threat under Mal’Ganis’s powerful aura. Renolock also sustains itself heavily in the lategame with its powerful spells created by Kazakus, and thick board refreshes with N’Zoth, the Corruptor. If one of these packages doesn’t win you the game on its own, prepare another one by playing Expired Merchant at the right time to create another Bloodreaver Gul’Dan or N’Zoth, The Corruptor.
    • Deck Type: Control
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Zephyrs the Great, Kazakus, Reno Jackson, Zilliax, Mal’Ganis, Bloodreaver Gul’dan, N’Zoth, the Corruptor, Lord Godfrey
      • Epic: Dirty Rat, Doomsayer, Skulking Geist, Twisting Nether, Voidlord
      • Rare: Defile, Despicable Dreadlord
      • Common: Kobold Librarian, Mistress of Mixtures, Voidcaller
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Highlander Kit (Reno, Kazakus, Zephyrs) + Lord Godfrey + Brann Bronzebeard + Zola the Gorgon
  2. Bloodreaver Gul’dan + Mal’Ganis + Voidlord + Riftcleaver
  3. N’Zoth, the Corruptor + Zilliax + Twisting Nether + Dirty Rat
  4. Emperor Thaurissan + Loatheb
  5. SN1P-SN4P + Skulking Geist

Renomage (Reno Mage)

    • Renomage is a Highlander archetype deck, meaning that the list cannot contain any duplicate cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, powerful effects are activated in the key Highlander cards such as Reno Jackson, Reno the Relicologist, Kazakus, and Zephyrs the Great. Renomage in specific aims to grind the opponent out of resources through powerful board clears and single target removal, while at the same time setting up conditions where the opponent can be bursted down (Brann Bronzebeard, Cloud Prince, Echo of Medivh/Barista Lynchen) or shut off from a win (Frost Lich Jaina, N’Zoth, the Corruptor). One thing to note about this deck is that its lists tend to vary drastically amongst players, and no one build is the best. If this is the deck you plan to build, do some research on current lists to ensure that you are building the best one possible for you.
    • Deck Type: Control
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Zephyrs the Great, Kazakus, Reno Jackson, Reno the Relicologist, Frost Lich Jaina, Zilliax, N’Zoth, the Corruptor, Brann Bronzebeard
      • Epic: Ice Block, Dirty Rat, Meteor, Echo of Medivh, Skulking Geist
      • Rare: Potion of Polymorph, Blizzard, Khartut Defender
      • Common: Ancient Mysteries, Mad Scientist, Flame Ward, Cloud Prince
    • Crafting Priority Order 2:
  1. Highlander Kit (Reno Jackson, Reno the Relicologist, Kazakus, Zephyrs) + Frost Lich Jaina + Zilliax
  2. N’Zoth, the Corruptor + Ice Block + Meteor
  3. Brann Bronzebeard + Emperor Thaurissan + Dirty Rat
  4. Barista Lynchen + Hex Lord Malacrass + Zola the Gorgon + Echo of Medivh
  5. SN1P-SN4P + Skulking Geist

Odd/Even

Even Shaman

    • Overview: Even Shaman is an Even archetype deck, activated by Genn Greymane, who requires your deck to be built with only even-costed cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, Genn will halve the cost of your hero power to (1) for the entire game at the beginning, granted your deck meets the requirement upon the start of the game (which it will). Even Shaman in particular takes advantage of its cheap and potent minions (Totem Golem, Murkspark Eel, Flamewreathed Faceless) to establish threatening board states early on, use its reduced cost hero power to increase the power of other minions (Thing From Below, Draenei Totemcarver, Sea Giant), and create sudden board bursts with its Overload package (Vessina, Thunderhead, Totemic Surge, Likkim)
    • Deck Type: Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Genn Greymane, Vessina, Ragnaros the Firelord
      • Epic: Sea Giant, Thunderhead
      • Rare: Murkspark Eel, Devolve, Thing From Below, Draenei Totemcarver, Likkim
      • Common: Totem Golem, Fireguard Destroyer, Sandstorm Elemental, Crackle, Totemic Surge, EVIL Totem
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Genn Greymane + Sea Giant
  2. Vessina + Thunderhead
  3. Ragnaros the Firelord

Even Warlock

    • Overview: Even Warlock is an Even archetype deck, activated by Genn Greymane, who requires your deck to be built with only even-costed cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, Genn will halve the cost of your hero power to (1) for the entire game at the beginning, granted your deck meets the requirement upon the start of the game (which it will). Even Warlock in particular takes advantage of Warlock’s hand package (Mountain Giant, Twilight Drake, Sunfury Protector) and self-damage package (Molten Giant, Hooked Reaver, Diseased Vulture, Wrathguard, Vulgar Homunculus, Lesser Amethyst Spellstone, Riftcleaver). In addition to these, Even Warlock also creates more threats with cards such as Faceless Shambler and Expired Merchant to quickly close out games through its board of massive raw stats.
    • Deck Type: Midrange/Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Genn Greymane, Mojomaster Zihi, Lich King
      • Epic: Mountain Giant, Molten Giant, Faceless Shambler, Diseased Vulture, Riftcleaver
      • Rare: Twilight Drake, Sunfury Protector, Defile, Lesser Amethyst Spellstone, Hooked Reaver, Expired Merchant
      • Common: Spellbreaker, Darkbomb, Vulgar Homunculus, Wrathguard, Shroom Brewer
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Genn Greymane + Mountain Giant + Molten Giant
  2. Mojomaster Zihi + Faceless Shambler + Diseased Vulture
  3. Lich King + Riftcleaver (1-2 copies) + Skulking Geist (one copy)

Odd Rogue

    • Overview: Odd Rogue is an Odd archetype deck, activated by Baku the Mooneater, who requires your deck to be built with only odd-costed cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, Baku will upgrade your hero power to for the entire game at the beginning, granted your deck meets the requirement upon the start of the game (which it will). In Odd Rogue, this upgraded hero power is a 2/2 weapon for 2 mana instead of the normal 1/2 weapon for 2 mana one, and allows for better trades and additional face damage throughout the game. Odd Rogue in particular takes advantage of its early game threats (such as Hench-Clan Thug and EVIL Miscreant) and Pirate package (Southsea Deckhand, Swashburglar, Patches the Pirate, Southsea Captain) to create threatening board states early on that can be buffed with the power card Fungalmancer in the midgame. In addition to these things, Odd Rogue can also manage the opponent’s board with cards such as Vilespine Slayer, Dark Iron Skulker, and Zilliax along with generated Lackeys from EVIL Miscreant. Cards such as Deadly Poison and Leeroy Jenkins can also provide Odd Rogue with the reach they need to close out games.
    • Deck Type: Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Baku the Mooneater, Leeroy Jenkins, Zilliax, Loatheb, Patches the Pirate, SN1P-SN4P
      • Epic: Vilespine Slayer, Corridor Creeper, Southsea Captain
      • Rare: Dark Iron Skulker
      • Common: EVIL Miscreant, Hench-Clan Thug, Fungalmancer, Fire Fly, Buccaneer, Swashburglar, Southsea Deckhand
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Baku the Mooneater + Leeroy Jenkins + Patches the Pirate + Vilespine Slayer + Corridor Creeper
  2. Loatheb + Zilliax + Southsea Captain
  3. SN1P-SN4P

Odd Paladin

    • Overview: Odd Paladin is an Odd archetype deck, activated by Baku the Mooneater, who requires your deck to be built with only odd-costed cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, Baku will upgrade your hero power to for the entire game at the beginning, granted your deck meets the requirement upon the start of the game (which it will). In Odd Paladin, this upgraded hero power is two 1/1 Silver Hand Recruits for 2 mana instead of the normal one 1/1 Silver Hand Recruit for 2 mana one, and allows for building a wider board and creating additional tokens for board buffing cards throughout the game. Odd Paladin in particular takes advantage of its board generation package (Lost in the Jungle, Muster for Battle, Vinecleaver) in tandem with its board buffing package (Blessing of Might, Never Surrender!, Rallying Blade, Steward of Darkshire, Unidentified Maul, Warhorse Trainer, Fungalmancer, Quartermaster) to create threatening board states that can both efficiently trade and go face for high amounts of damage.
    • Deck Type: Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Baku the Mooneater, Leeroy Jenkins, Loatheb, Patches the Pirate
      • Epic: Corridor Creeper, Quartermaster
      • Rare: Muster for Battle, Competitive Spirit, Divine Favor, Rallying Blade, Steward of Darkshire, Unidentified Maul, Vinecleaver
      • Common: Lost in the Jungle, Never Surrender!, Southsea Deckhand, Warhorse Trainer
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Baku the Mooneater + Leeroy Jenkins + Corridor Creeper + Quartermaster
  2. Loatheb + Patches the Pirate

Odd Warrior

    • Overview: Odd Warrior is an Odd archetype deck, activated by Baku the Mooneater, who requires your deck to be built with only odd-costed cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, Baku will upgrade your hero power to for the entire game at the beginning, granted your deck meets the requirement upon the start of the game (which it will). In Odd Warrior, this upgraded hero power is 4 Armor for 2 mana instead of the normal 2 Armor for 2 mana one, and allows for gaining more health to survive longer and improve Armor-based cards (such as Shield Slam and Reckless Flurry). Odd Warrior in particular takes advantage of its stalling tools (Shield Slam, Deathlord, Bash, Shield Block, Reckless Flurry, Stonehill Defender, Brawl, Dyn-o-matic, Supercollider) so that it can transition into its late game plan of infinite value (Dr. Boom, Mad Genius, Archivist Elysiana, Azalina Soulthief, Zola the Gorgon).
    • Deck Type: Control
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Baku the Mooneater, Dr. Boom, Mad Genius, Zilliax, Archivist Elysiana, Azalina Soulthief, Zola the Gorgon
      • Epic: Shield Slam, Reckless Flurry, Brawl, Supercollider, Big Game Hunter
      • Rare: Omega Assembly, Coldlight Oracle, Deathlord, Stonehill Defender, Dyn-o-matic
      • Common: Bash, Ravaging Ghoul
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Baku the Mooneater + Dr. Boom, Mad Genius + Zilliax + Shield Slam + Reckless Flurry + Brawl
  2. Archivist Elysiana + Azalina Soulthief + Supercollider (one copy)
  3. Brann Bronzebeard + Zola the Gorgon + Big Game Hunter (one copy)

Quest Mage

    • Overview: Quest Mage is a deck based around the Legendary Quest “Open the Waygate,” which requires you to play 6 spells that didn’t start in your deck (therefore generated spells) to receive the Legendary reward “Time Warp,” a 5 mana spell that gives you an extra turn. Quest Mage achieves this through playing multiple spell generation cards (Magic Trick, Ray of Frost, Primordial Glyph) especially in tandem with cheap spells (Mirror Image, Ancient Mysteries, Research Project) with or without a Sorcerer’s Apprentice on board followed by an Elemental Evocation + Mana Cyclone, which will generate even more spells to help complete the quest or outright win the game. Large bursts come from Flamewakers with multiple cheap spells, or the true goal of the deck, a two-turn kill with Archmage Vargoth, Timewarp, and two 0 cost Arcane Giants.
    • Deck Type: Combo
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Open the Waygate, Archmage Vargoth, Stargazer Luna
      • Epic: Arcane Giant, Mana Cyclone, Primordial Glyph, Ice Block
      • Rare: Magic Trick, Flamewaker
      • Common: Elemental Evocation, Ray of Frost, Ancient Mysteries, Research Project, Sorcerer’s Apprentice, Flame Ward
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Open the Waygate + Archmage Vargoth + Arcane Giant + Mana Cyclone
  2. Stargazer Luna + Primordial Glyph + Ice Block (one copy)

Secret Mage

    • Overview: Secret Mage is a hyper-aggressive deck that aims to quickly burn the opponent down through playing free Secrets (Kabal Lackey, Ancient Mysteries, Mad Scientist, Kirin Tor Mage) to both disrupt the opponent’s gameplan and activate damage dealing cards (Medivh’s Valet, Arcane Flakmage, Cloud Prince) that both establish a board state and get the opponent closer to death. Finally, cards such as Polymorph: Boar, Fireball, Forgotten Torch, and discounted Kabal Crystal Runner can be used to further establish the board and provide even extra reach for early kills. If all else fails or you get grinded out of resources early on, Aluneth rapidly cycles through your deck eventually guaranteeing your win (or demise if you happen to go up against a high health Warrior or Mill Rogue). To put things in perspective, if you were to play every damage dealing card in the deck, you could deal up to 66 damage alone. That doesn’t even include the multiple minion attacks you could make throughout the game.
    • Deck Type: Hyper-Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Aluneth
      • Epic: Ice Block
      • Rare: Kirin Tor Mage, Kabal Crystal Runner, Explosive Runes, Counterspell, Potion of Polymorph, Polymorph: Boar, Arcane Flakmage
      • Common: Medivh’s Valet, Cloud Prince, Arcanologist, Kabal Lackey, Mad Scientist, Ancient Mysteries, Forgotten Torch, Flame Ward, Duplicate, Mirror Entity
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Aluneth + Ice Block (one copy)

Big Priest (Resurrect Priest)

    • Overview: Big Priest, also known as Resurrect Priest, is a long standing archetype/deck that abuses the cards Barnes and Shadow Essence to put powerful minions into play extremely early on. After doing so, they can use the resurrect package (Resurrect, Eternal Servitude, Lesser Diamond Spellstone, Mass Resurrection, and even Catrina Muerte’s end of turn ability) to bring back these threatening minions for extremely cheap costs. To stall the game and stay alive until they can find or even play their threats to resurrect, Big Priest plays a slew of boardclears and single target removal (such as Forbidden Words, Shadow Word: Pain, Spirit Lash, Shadow Word: Death, Mass Hysteria, Excavated Evil, Lightbomb, Dragonfire Potion, Psychic Scream, Shadowreaper Anduin, Plague of Death) to keep the board maintained or completely clear. Big Priest tends to outright win with the sheer stats and threats they can build up extremely early on, and threats such as Archmage Vargoth, Catrina Muerte, Obsidian Statue, and Y’Shaarj, Rage Unbound speed up this process tenfold. There’s only two effective ways to beat this deck: play an extremely aggressive deck (such as Secret Mage or Mech Hunter) and pray the Big Priest doesn’t draw well; or play Mage/Shaman and Polymorph/Hex/Devolve/Plague of Murloc their board and pray that they resurrect the weak token/minion multiple times. One thing to note about this deck is that it is the most complained about and controversial deck in the Wild community online (and rightfully so). This means that this deck is always at risk of being nerfed in some way at some point, however nothing has been done about it yet and there has even been some developer commentary defending the deck, so one could argue that it’s safe to sink the dust into this list.
    • Deck Type: Control/Aggro Hybrid
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Barnes, Archmage Vargoth, Catrina Muerte, Y’Shaarj, Rage Unbound, The Lich King, Ragnaros the Firelord, Shadowreaper Anduin
      • Epic: Obsidian Statue, Shadow Visions, Psychic Scream, Lightbomb, Plague of Death
      • Rare: Shadow Essence, Eternal Servitude, Resurrect, Lesser Diamond Spellstone, Mass Resurrection, Mass Hysteria, Greater Healing Potion, Forbidden Words
      • Common: Spirit Lash
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Barnes + Archmage Vargoth + Catrina Muerte + Y’Shaarj, Rage Unbound + The Lich King + Ragnaros the Firelord + Shadowreaper Anduin + Obsidian Statue
  2. Shadow Visions + Psychic Scream + Lightbomb (one copy) + Plague of Death (one copy)

Combo Priest

    • Overview: Combo Priest, also known as Inner Fire Priest, is an archetype that has existed since the release of Hearthstone, based around the Classic cards Inner Fire and Divine Spirit. Combo Priest can either be built around a solid Dragon package (Twilight Whelp, Netherspite Historian, Duskbreaker, Twilight Guardian, Drakonid Operative) or a solid high health minion package (Injured Tol’vir, Deathlord, Injured Blademaster) but the general idea is that you run one of the two versions and build around it. For the sake of this guide’s simplicity, I will be focusing on the Dragon package which is generally more affordable and resurfacable long term. Combo Priest aims to get an immediate win by sticking a high health minion on board and having the combo pieces (Power Word: Shield, Extra Arms, Divine Spirit, Inner Fire, Kabal Talonpriest) ready in hand. The basic idea is to add as much health to a single high health minion (that can attack) as possible (Power Word: Shield, Extra Arms, Kabal Talonpriest), then Divine Spirit that minion once (or twice!) and Inner Fire to finish it off and slap face for the win. Cards such as Northshire Cleric, Acolyte of Pain, and Shadow Visions help greatly in cycling through the deck for combo pieces, and cards such as Silence and Mass Dispel remove Taunt and other negative effects from enemy minions that would otherwise prevent the combo from winning the game.
    • Deck Type: Combo
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: High Priest Amet, Loatheb
      • Epic: Shadow Visions, Twilight Acolyte, Twilight Guardian
      • Rare: Extra Arms, Wild Pyromancer, Deathlord, Injured Blademaster, Mass Dispel, Duskbreaker, Drakonid Operative
      • Common: Circle of Healing, Silence, Inner Fire, Potion of Madness, Twilight Whelp, Radiant Elemental, Injured Tol’vir, Acolyte of Pain, Kabal Talonpriest
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Shadow Visions + Loatheb
  2. Twilight Guardian + Twilight Acolyte

Jade Druid

    • Overview: Jade Druid is a deck built around the Jade mechanic from the Mean Streets of Gadgetzan expansion, which produces a 1/1 Jade Golem to begin with and scales by 1/1 with each additional Jade Golem producing card played. Fortunately and unfortunately, a little card called Jade Idol exists, which makes this deck (and any Druid deck for that matter) possible to never fatigue in a game and eventually reach the maximum Jade count (30), producing multiple 30/30 Jade Golems. Jade Druid gets to this point by using its defensive package (Lesser Jasper Spellstone, Naturalize, Ferocious Howl, Oaken Summons, Hecklebot, Poison Seeds, Starfall, Zilliax, Spreading Plague, Malfurion the Pestilent) to stall and prolong the game while playing the Jade package cards (Jade Idol, Jade Blossom, Jade Behemoth, Aya Blackpaw) to ramp up the Jade Golems and start building a threatening board in the mid-late game. For added measure, Jade Druid also runs a cycle package (Ferocious Howl, Archmage Vargoth, Branching Paths, Nourish, Overflow, Ultimate Infestation) to get more tools throughout the game or even cycle multiple copies of Jade Idol left in the deck at the late lategame into their hand to generate a big board at once. Jade Druid has a long and self-sustaining life in Wild, however its Kryptonite comes in the from of the Epic card Skulking Geist whose Battlecry effect reads, “Destroy all 1-Cost spells in both hands and decks.” which you guessed it, deletes Jade Idol from the deck for good.
    • Deck Type: Midrange/Control Hybrid
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Malfurion the Pestilent, Archmage Vargoth, Aya Blackpaw, Zilliax, Loatheb
      • Epic: Branching Paths, Arcane Tyrant, Anubisath Defender, Ultimate Infestation
      • Rare: Jade Idol, Spreading Plague, Hecklebot, Starfall, Nourish, Lesser Jasper Spellstone, Overflow
      • Common: Jade Blossom, Wrath, Naturalize, Ferocious Howl, Oaken Summons, Poison Seeds, Jade Behemoth
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Malfurion the Pestilent + Archmage Vargoth + Zilliax + Branching Paths + Ultimate Infestation
  2. Loatheb + Aya Blackpaw + Arcane Tyrant + Anubisath Defender

Murloc Shaman

    • Overview: Murloc Shaman is an eternally relevant hyper-aggressive deck that aims to quickly burn the opponent down through building and buffing a large and threatening board of Murlocs, a tribe in the game. Murloc Shaman is able to stay eternally relevant simply due to the fact that they’ve had the tools to build the framework of the deck since the launch of the game, and each new release only adds to or improves them even further over time. There’s really not much to this deck archetype nor are there a wide variety of lists. For the most part, it’s the same core set of Murlocs along with premium Murloc cards released throughout the course of the game, with some odd/unique additions and twists here and there. The basics of this deck is to mulligan for a good curve depending on whether you’re going first and second, get any synergies possible online, and buff a wide board with Everyfin is Awesome and/or Bloodlust for the win.
    • Deck Type: Hyper-Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Scargill, Finja (both cycle in and out of the list, not required)
      • Epic: Murloc Warleader, Gentle Megasaur, Plague of Murlocs
      • Rare: Murloc Tidecaller, Sludge Slurper, Devolve, Underbelly Angler, Coldlight Seer, Murloc Tastyfin, Everyfin is Awesome
      • Common: Murloc Tinyfin, Toxfin, Brrrloc, Rockpool Hunter, Call in the Finishers
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Murloc Warleader, Gentle Megasaur
  2. Plague of Murlocs
  3. Scargill
  4. Finja

Mech Hunter

    • Overview: Mech Hunter is a generally relevant hyper-aggressive deck that aims to quickly burn the opponent down through building and buffing (through the Magnetize keyword) a large and threatening board of Mechs, a tribe in the game. Mech Hunter is able to stay generally relevant simply due to the fact that most of their solid tools to build the framework of the deck come from the Goblins vs Gnomes and Boomsday Project expansions, both of which were heavily themed around Mechs. There’s really not much to this deck archetype nor are there a wide variety of lists. For the most part, it’s a solid core set of Mechs (Mecharoo, Galvanizer, Mechwarper, Venomizer, Metaltooth Leaper) along with premium Mech cards released throughout the course of the game, that are either aggressively stated and/or buff the board which makes them easy to slot in. The basics of this deck is to mulligan for a good curve depending on whether you’re going first and second, get any synergies possible online, get large and sudden bursts from the Magnetize ability, and buff a wide board with Metaltooth Leaper and/or Enhance-o Mechano for the win.
    • Deck Type: Hyper-Aggro
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Zilliax, SN1P-SN4P
      • Epic: Enhance-o Mechano
      • Rare: Galvanizer, Metaltooth Leaper, Jeeves, Replicating Menace
      • Common: Cogmaster, Mecharoo, Mechwarper, Upgradable Framebot, Venomizer, Flying Machine, Ursatron, Explodinator, Wargear
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Zilliax + SN1P-SN4P
  2. Enhance-o Mechano (1-2 copies depending on the list)

Currently Relevant Lists:

Lists that are in this category have proven to be relevant in the most recent meta/expansion of the game. Some of these lists are currently in the “proving grounds” stage of their lifespan, displaying through raw stats if they have what it takes to stay on a tier list well into the future. Keep in mind that some of the following lists below may fall short of their initial success or fall out of relevance in future (or even the next) sets.

Mecha’thun Warlock

    • Overview: Mecha’thun Warlock is a Control Warlock archetype that aims to setup a combo-kill finish. After fully cycling through the deck, Mecha’thun, the namesake card of the deck, can use its effect to immediately kill the opponent regardless of the state of the game. This combo-kill finish is setup by successfully playing out Emperor Thaurissan while a copy of Bloodbloom and Mecha’thun are currently in your hand to reduce them both by (1), empty out your deck with cycle cards (Mortal Coil, The Soularium, Sense Demons, Hemet, Jungle Hunter), and maintaining at least 5 health so that when Cataclysm is cast for 4 health (under Bloodbloom’s effect) you are not killed off. To reach this state, Mecha’thun Warlock takes advantage of its defensive Demon package (Bloodreaver Gul’dan, Voidlord, Mal’Ganis, and Voidcaller) in addition with their clear package (Defile, Plague of Flames, Lord Godfrey) to stall and prolong the game in the meantime.
    • Deck Type: Control/Combo Hybrid
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Mecha’thun, Hemet, Jungle Hunter, Emperor Thaurissan, Reno Jackson, Zilliax, Mal’Ganis, Bloodreaver Gul’dan, Lord Godfrey
      • Epic: Bloodbloom, Cataclysm, Voidlord
      • Rare: Defile, Plague of Flames
      • Common: Kobold Librarian, Mistress of Mixtures, Sense Demons, Voidcaller, Antique Healbot
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Mecha’thun, Hemet + Jungle Hunter + Emperor Thaurissan + Bloodbloom + Cataclysm (one copy) + Mal’Ganis + Bloodreaver Gul’dan + Voidlord
  2. Reno Jackson + Lord Godfrey

Control Darkest Hour Warlock

    • Overview: Control Darkest Hour Warlock is an all-in highroll archetype that aims to setup a massive early board combo that if pulled off soon enough, should guarantee a win. This combo revolves around playing either a powered up Rafaam’s Scheme or Fiendish Circle, playing a copy of Bloodbloom, and casting a copy of Darkest Hour for 6 health early, pulling anywhere from 4-7 threatening minions from deck depending on how many 1/1 tokens you created and/or had on board prior. At this point the massive board should be unanswerable or not answerable due to Nerubian Unraveler’s effect making the opponent’s boardclears unplayable at that point of the game. At this point, you can slam your opponent’s face for the win on your following turn, granted they didn’t concede already. If you can’t get your combo together quick enough, cards such as Sinister Deal, Plague of Flames, Defile, and Barnes can be used to stall the game, and cards such as Plot Twist and The Soularium can be used to cycle through your deck in hopes the combo can be found.
    • Deck Type: Control/Combo
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Y’Shaarj, Rage Unbound, Mal’Ganis, The Lich King, Kel’Thuzad, Barnes
      • Epic: Bloodbloom, Darkest Hour, Nerubian Unraveler, Voidlord
      • Rare: Plague of Flames, Defile, Plot Twist, Imp-losion
      • Common: Sinister Deal, Rafaam’s Scheme, Voidcaller
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Bloodbloom + Darkest Hour + Voidlord + Y’Shaarj, Rage Unbound + Mal’Ganis + The Lich King + Kel’Thuzad
  2. Barnes + Nerubian Unraveler

Murloc Paladin

    • Overview: Murloc Paladin returns from its glory days as Anyfin Paladin with its new iteration including the Prismatic Lens / Tip the Scales combo. Murloc Paladin aims to start the game with a solid curve of non-Murloc minions (Brazen Zealot, Beaming Sidekick, Righteous Protector, Southsea Deckhand, Shielded Minibot) until it can play a copy of Prismatic Lens, tutoring a generally low cost minion and hopefully copy of Tip the Scales (rather than another Prismatic Lens or Anyfin Can Happen). This allows Tip the Scales to be played much earlier than it normally would, pulling out a massively aggressive board of Murlocs (Grimscale Oracle, Bluegill Warrior, Murloc Warleader, Old Murk-Eye) that theoretically win the game right there, but in the off-chance it doesn’t can attempt to tutor out an Anyfin Can Happen early or Sunkeeper Tarim a wide board to hopefully provide enough burst to finish off the opponent. Cards such as Unidentified Maul and Gentle Megasaur are played to further improve the damage capability or survivability of the board, and Eater of Secrets or SI:7 Infiltrator is played to counter the devastating effects of specific Mage, Hunter, and Paladin Secrets that could cripple this deck’s gameplan.
    • Deck Type: Aggro/Combo Hybrid
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Old Murk-Eye, Sunkeeper Tarim, Patches the Pirate
      • Epic: Murloc Warleader, Gentle Megasaur, Prismatic Lens, Tip the Scales
      • Rare: Brazen Zealot, Unidentified Maul, Eater of Secrets, SI:7 Infiltrator, Anyfin Can Happen
      • Common: Beaming Sidekick, Righteous Protector, Southsea Deckhand, Shielded Minibot
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Old Murk-Eye + Patches the Pirate + Murloc Warleader + Prismatic Lens + Tip the Scales
  2. Sunkeeper Tarim + Gentle Megasaur

Cube Warlock

    • Overview: Cube Warlock resurfaces once more with the addition of Expired Merchant to generate more value! Who thought that making another Gul’dan to bring back a massive board would be good? Cube Warlock focuses on cycling through its deck to get Voidcallers on and off the board as fast as possible, and the Legendary weapon “Skull of the Man’ari” in play so that big and threatening Demons can be pulled early and with no downsides. Then, Carnivorous Cube along with a Dark Pact is used to kill off a strong Demon such as Doomguard, Voidlord, or Mal’Ganis and summon two copies of it in its place. With this combo, game-winning damage can be accrued through Doomguard’s multiple attacks or a thick enough board (Voidlord, Mal’Ganis) can be created that an opponent with no efficient boardclears can simply not win.
    • Deck Type: Control/Combo Hybrid
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Skull of the Man’ari, Mal’Ganis, Bloodreaver Gul’dan, N’Zoth, the Corruptor, Spiritsinger Umbra
      • Epic: Doomsayer, Carnivorous Cube, Faceless Manipulator, Voidlord
      • Rare: Defile, Expired Merchant, Lesser Amethyst Spellstone, Doomguard
      • Common: Dark Pact, Kobold Librarian, Sense Demons, Voidcaller
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Skull of the Man’ari + Mal’Ganis + Bloodreaver Gul’dan + N’Zoth, the Corruptor + Doomsayer + Carnivorous Cube + Faceless Manipulator (one copy) + Voidlord
  2. Spiritsinger Umbra

Reno Shaman

    • Overview: Reno Shaman is a Highlander archetype deck, meaning that the list cannot contain any duplicate cards. Despite this tradeoff being pretty hefty, powerful effects are activated in the key Highlander cards such as Reno Jackson and Zephyrs the Great. Reno Shaman in specific aims to grind the opponent out of resources through powerful board clears and single target removal, while at the same time generating high amounts of value with specific cards (Hagatha the Witch, Shudderwock, N’Zoth, the Corruptor) One thing to note about this deck is that its current playrate is fairly low and does not have a high amount of stats to go off of. If you cannot build this deck for little to no dust, it is recommended you invest your resources into persistent Reno lists (Renomage/Renolock).
    • Deck Type: Control
    • Key Cards:
      • Legendary: Reno Jackson, Zephyrs the Great, Hagatha the Witch, N’Zoth, the Corruptor, Brann Bronzebeard, Electra Stormsurge, Zola the Gorgon
      • Epic: Baleful Banker, Dirty Rat, Elemental Destruction, Far Sight, Haunting Visions, Skulking Geist
      • Rare: Sludge Slurper, Devolve, Bog Slosher, Hagatha’s Scheme, Sludge Belcher, Volcano, Khartut Defender, Earthquake
      • Common: Reincarnate, Sandstorm Elemental, Antique Healbot, Walking Fountain
    • Crafting Priority Order (All Commons/Rares should be made first):
  1. Reno Jackson + Zephyrs the Great + Hagatha the Witch + N’Zoth, the Corruptor + Baleful Banker + Dirty Rat + Elemental Destruction + Far Sight + Haunting Visions + Skulking Geist
  2. Brann Bronzebeard + Electra Stormsurge + Zola the Gorgon

You’re All Set! Do You Mind Staying For A Couple Minutes More?

I’ve covered all that I know about Wild in this guide, and you should be set to start your journey out into the expansive jungle that Wild is. Maybe you’ll find and meet some new faces that you’ve never had the chance to play before, or maybe you’ll be reunited with old friends and familiar faces you once loved to play. At the end of the day, Wild is what you make it, and what you’ve hopefully learned from the above information shows that there’s no one way or small set of ways to play in the mode.

If you don’t mind taking a few moments out of your day, I’d appreciate it greatly if you took the time to answer the feedback survey linked below. This will help me to better develop and expand this guide in the future, and also allow me to get additional questions and requested information about the mode/decks added over time. This is also the place to ask any questions if you have any! Alternatively, you may contact me through Twitter if you have a specific question and/or want to get a quicker answer.

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